Category: ninja

Using Rotating Residential Proxies Online

Finding a proxy or two online isn’t very hard, there’s always a few new ones being left open somewhere. Perhaps from an inexperienced administrator who’s accidentally left his server open to the world or someone who’s not configured their firewall properly. It’s actually much more easily done than you’d imagine, often web enabled applications install or enable proxy services with little warning. Before you realise then thousands of strangers are piggybacking your server and bandwidth without your permission. Of course, this scenario is even more likely with the prevalence of ‘always on’ internet connections in millions of homes across the world. Lots of malware is configured to install things like Glype proxies or FTP servers for attackers to use without their owners knowledge too.

Rotating Residential Proxies
Despite this, the reliability and of course the safety of using these servers is obviously not great. Using someones misconfigured or worse hacked server is never a wise move even if you accept the fact that you’ll be sharing it with thousands of others. Yet the demand for proxies for a variety of reasons is growing all the time.

So why do people need loads of proxies? After all you can only use one at the time when you’re browsing the web or watching something online. Well there are actually lots of reasons, people use all sorts of automated software which harvest and analyse data, post adverts on multiple sites, or even bots which are used to buy products online.

Internet marketers for instance use all sorts of software to promote their products by automatically posting on social media, creating links on websites publishing adverts on commercial sites. Other people use bots (automated robots) to make multiple applications for online goods like sneakers and concert tickets for reselling. There are literally hundreds of applications which require access to multiple identities to work properly and they need proxies and lots of them.

Let’s take one example, there’s a whole host of online tools which allow people to buy lots of the latest sneakers online. These work by making repeated applications and requests to the web servers until they are successful, unfortunately if all these applications come from the same IP address then they get blocked very quickly. In order to work these ‘bots’ need lots of residential IP addresses to work, they’re commonly described as sneaker proxies but all they are is proxy servers which have access to lots of these home registered addresses. Each one of these residential addresses however is expensive and if they are overloaded become worthless as they end up being blocked by the websites themselves.

There is a solution developed by the specialist residential IP providers who operate in this space, who’ve developed systems that give access to hundred of residential proxies and addresses.

Rotating Residential Proxies

The problem is two fold, the IP addresses that are needed are classified as residential ones which in turn are extremely difficult to obtain unless you own an ISP. These applications also need lots of these addresses to run properly because each individual connection needs to be made from a different IP address. Having dedicated access to hundreds of residential IP addresses would cost a fortune every month so a systems has been developed which allows these addresses to be shared effectively.

They are known as backconnect residential proxies and they are in effect a single proxy gateway which gives access to a whole network of individual proxies with different configurations. The backconnect proxy operates usually under a single gateway IP address yet rotates it’s external calls through randomly selecting individual residential based proxy servers. The gateway will automatically rotate through these addresses every few minutes so that no single address is ever the same or over utilized. This is essential because if too many requests come through a single address then this will be flagged by the destination websites and they’re likely to be blocked. This makes them worthless for that particular site until the block is lifted.

This setup means that all you need to do is configure your application to point at a single gateway IP address and the backconnect proxy will then rotate through individual proxies automatically, making them virtually indistinguishable from normal home users. They can be used to automate all sorts of tasks from applying for concert tickets, to posting hundreds of adverts on localised portals like Craigslist or Gumtree. Without using software and residential proxies then posting more than a single time would be pretty much impossible.

Each individual connection therefore looks like it comes from a completely different location and machine.  Each of these proxies not only has a different residential IP address but a completely different footprint too supplying varying metadata like OS, browser types etc to complete the deception.

The other main advantage though is that it significantly brings down the cost.  Because each server is only used for a couple of minutes by each backconnect proxy before being rotated, that means that they can be shared around users and applications much more effectively.  Paying for dedicated access to thousands of residential proxies would cost a fortune and would simply not pay.

Using this method,  for a few dollars you can have automated software running through this network of residential proxies almost twenty four hours a day. This  means that it’s much more affordable for all sorts of online entrepreneurs.   remember some of the applications only cost a few hundred dollars and can earn people a substantial online income.  We’ve mentioned the ‘sneaker bots’ above, the applications which automate buying designer and limited availability sneakers – many individuals earn a six figure income from running these Bots and reselling the sneakers on places like eBay and Amazon.

So if you’re looking to expand your online empire, or need to run automated software which requires multiple residential IP addresses then you’re best bet is using rotating residential proxies.   This is a very specialised market and they’re only a few companies who maintain and run such a network, here’s our recommendation.

The fastest, safest and best rotating residential proxies come from a company called Storm.

Storm

Check out their backconnect residential proxy trial which you can test for 48 hours and get your money refunded if they don’t work for you.

How to Unlock More Movies on Netflix

One of the problems with Netflix is it’s just too big! Much is made of of it’s super clever algorithm which is designed to guide you to your favorite shows, however the reality is that most of us will never come across thousands of the shows and movies stored on there. Most of the versions of Netflix are the same but the US version has even more content with some estimates suggesting tens of thousands more films and TV shows. Here’s how to unlock more movies on Netflix using a simple hack.

So how can we browse all these films more easily, well some clever chap has discovered a way to break out of Netflix’s suggested movies mode and dive straight into specific categories.

It turns out that you can go straight to thousands of pre-defined categories on Netflix just by using the correct URL. For instance, here’s a few.

Classic Comedies – http://www.netflix.com/browse/genre/31694
Music Documentaries – http://www.netflix.com/browse/genre/90361
Sports Dramas – http://www.netflix.com/browse/genre/7243

You can access them by modifying the end number of the URL and you’ll be directed straight to that category if you’re logged into Netflix. There are in fact 76,000 different categories some of them extremely specific – for instance there’s a category of ‘Witty Movies by Woody Allen’.

Fortunately someone has produced an incredible list of all 76000 categories which you can find on this link. Just have a browse and you’re bound to find a few categories of interest that you’ve never found.

What’s more if you switch to another version of Netflix then these categories still work but you’ll see different movies and shows depending on which country. SO for example you could use one the Netflix VPNs such as this and switch countries before clicking the URL and see loads more. That means you can go directly to very specific genres under each country variant armed with this list and a Netflix working VPN.

It’s definitely worth trying and of course the Netflix algorithm will pick up on your choices after you watch and rate them to update your standard auto-generated menu’s too.

Best UK VPN Access for iPlayer

Which is the best UK VPN Access provider with British based servers for BBC iPlayer?  It’s a difficult question, simply down to the huge choice that is available now online.  Years ago, I was involved in a project to install a Virtual Private Network (VPN) client on thousands of laptops in a large multinational company.  The laptops consisted of wide variety of hardware, lots of different language builds and each had different software installed (even some VPN client software which needed to be removed first).   One thing I did learn throughout this project is that VPN client software can cause all sorts of problems mainly concerned with network connectivity if it doesn’t work properly.

best vpn for UK TV abroad

Reliable Software is Important

This is why, choosing a reliable VPN service is so important. For most of us, an internet connection is why we use our computers, using a poor service will at best slow down your connection and at worse completely break it. A VPN needs to be well configured, maintained and supported both at the client and the server side to work quickly, securely and seamlessly.

In fact seamlessly is an important point, because the better a service is, the less impact it will have on your connection.  If your internet speeds plummet to a slow crawl as soon as you enable the connection then it’s going to be fairly worthless.

Most people need a VPN for the following reasons:

  • Secure their connection and personal details.
  • Access blocked websites like Hulu, BBC iPlayer, ABC and others.
  • Privacy

There are other reasons, but it’s mainly to bypass blocks and ensure security, any well run VPN should be able to supply both of these.  If you’re interested in a accessing a particular service like British TV online then a fast UK connection is the priority.  This is an important point, the best VPN or Smart DNS service will actually allow you access to a network of VPN servers in different countries. However it is the speed of the specific servers that you connect to which will ultimately determine how it performs.

For example, many services offer a server in a few different countries, which is great if you are not concerned about which country you connect to.  However if you want to watch and access the BBC online then you will have to select a UK one to change your IP address, unfortunately so will many others.   Which is why for so many companies popular servers will be completely overloaded.

Identity Cloaker monitor their servers 24/7 and because they are one of the oldest and safest UK VPN Access providers on the internet they have a wealth of expertise in maintaining fast, accessible servers.  They also have deployed servers based on demand – their network has dozens of UK and US servers with huge, available bandwidth to be used for the popular media sites like the BBC and Hulu, but less servers based in other countries.

Which means their UK VPN servers are fast, very fast especially when used with the compression algorithm in the client software.

The reality is that the service is one of the best because it has been around for so long and been actively developed.  The software is sophisticated and robust, the servers have been optimized over the years to provide the fastest and most effective service.

Here’s a great example, although Identity Cloaker was originally available using the client software which redirected through a UK BBC proxy for British addresses but it was becoming apparent that demand was moving towards different devices.  For example many people were starting to stream video directly onto Smart TVs, tablets or media devices.  Making different versions of the VPN client software was almost impossible for many of these devices, how do you install software onto your Smart TV for example?

Which is why all the Identity Cloaker servers were modified to allow direct VPN connections from other devices.  Basically it was possible now to set up your VPN connection manually on tablets, ipads and phones.  You can even connect directly from your router to effectively switch every device to use the VPN even things like Smart TVs – watch this video.

This won’t be suitable for everyone of course, because by default it does effect every device connected to that router.  However it’s a marvelous fix for situations where you can’t get access to the network configuration settings and still need the a good VPN you can get access to.   Most modern routers will have this facility, although unfortunately in the UK there is a tendency for ISPs to supply heavily restricted devices.  BT have removed the majority of the connection settings in it’s Home Hub device including much of the VPN functionality.  The overriding advantage of this message though is that the IP address is classed as a residential one, a valuable asset that you’d normally pay for from a residential IP provider !

However for speed, security and reliability then I can thoroughly recommend Identity Cloaker which you can try out for 10 days using their . .

Lessons from the Internet of Things – Do you Trust Your Fridge?

The ‘Internet of Things‘ is one of the most discussed topics on technical forums at the moment. The idea that you can enable all sorts of devices with a network card and a bit of memory to attach it online obviously has many benefits. It reminds me of the excitement of the ‘Trojan Room Coffee Machine which was a live video stream of a coffee machine hooked up in Cambridge University, via MPLS and an Acorn Archimedes (remember them!) in 1993. Sure it was just a coffee machine, certainly the picture rarely changed – it was either full, empty or half empty – but the realisation that you could check on it in real time without leaving your chair was kind of exciting at the time. The web cam was switched off in 2001, but many of us can still recall checking that the geeks in Cambridge had enough coffee.

isyourfridge-spamming

Nowadays of course, our devices are increasingly network aware, printers were of course, the logical first piece of equipment to stick online, it saved having them hooked up to computers and people could use them remotely. However it didn’t take long for hackers to target the first network enabled printers to infiltrate networks, distribute malware or just muck about by sending huge print jobs to them.

A story has broken this week in the security press which adds a strange twist with the first reported Spam attack by a fridge. The report released by the security firm, Proofpoint claims that a fridge took part in sending 750,000 email messages in a wide bot enabled Spam attack. It’s actually a little late as there have been similar reports as early as 2013 of this new vocation of our kitchen appliances, however it’s still rather disturbing.

Many of us, will perhaps question the need for kitchen appliances to have access to the internet. I for one can happily live without my fridge tweeting me that I’m out of milk, in fact being nagged by my fridge doesn’t appeal at all!! Manufacturers will point to the fact that internet access will provide a host of other benefits like fault finding and notifying manufacturer of potential problems. Again, the old school method of the fridge simply stopping working seems more than adequate. Imagine getting a call from a Samsung customer representative who has just been notified that your fridge light is not working by your erm fridge. It’s an internet horror story and the benefits negligible at best and in reality pretty much pointless.

Enabling these devices means there’s another headache you are responsible for, you’ll need to configure your fridge to connect, ensure it’s got a strong password and it’s behaving itself online.  How do you connect to your fridge, could you compromise other logins, should you use a VPN to connect?  Coming down in the morning and finding your fridge cornered by the FBI might seem far fetched but it’s not as ridiculous as it might seem.   Using these devices in botnets to attack other machines, send out spam or as proxies to attack other machines is perfectly feasible and it’s actually happening now.

Network security on these enabled devices is normally an after thought, it’s often much easier to hack into a network enabled device than a laptop or computer.   For example how many people would log onto their fridge after purchase to change the default password – but if you’ve bought  a fancy internet enabled smart fridge it’s something you really should do.   Already hackers have demonstrated how to to steal your google login from a Samsung fridge, at this years DefCon conference.  The fridge ran a flawed implementation of  SSL which failed to check false certificates making it vulnerable to MiTM attacks.

This ‘internet of things’ basically sounds like a huge pain, introducing fairly pointless benefits at the cost of loads of hassle and vulnerabilities.  Of course for things like printers and using my Smart TV to access online entertainment then it makes sense.  However I for one will not be upgrading my fridge anytime soon.

Surprising New Palestine Charity Donors

If you follow the security and hacker world, you’ll know that there is a constant tit-for-tat battle going on across countries, religions and ideologies.  One group will deface a certain web site usually with badly spelt propaganda and  ‘1337 speak’, then a few days later another group will retaliate with an attack on a different web site.  There’s lots of threats and tough talk, and it sometimes seems like there are literally thousands of these groups all over the world fighting their own cyber way.
computercrime

The reality is that it’s been happening for so long it doesn’t really make much impact any more, unless it’s a really big commercial name.  There’s another problem with this attack method, especially due to the minimal impact – it usually takes much more effort than it’s worth.  Of course there are literally thousands of ways to hack a web site – vulnerabilities on the code, the host, bruteforce passwords or pinch user credentials – the list is virtually endless.

However it does take time, and can take an awful lot of effort which is why it often looks like a complete waste of time.  You spend days finding out a web sites vulnerabilities and hack into it, replace it with your leet message – then take a couple of screenshots.  What happens then?  The owner changes all the password, closes the vulnerability and restores the original from backup and it’s all back to normal.  Unless you dash out and advertise the hack, then it’s likely not that many have even noticed and those who do have seen it all before anyway.   Of course if it’s a bank or a big commercial site then there is much more of an impact and of course commercial implications – but those sites are likely to take much more effort and resources to hack into anyway.

Which is why I think this was a rather innovative angle by a group of  pro-palestinian (or perhaps just anti-Israeli) hackers called AnonGhost (not impressed with that name!).  They’re involved in an cyber offensive against the Israeli’s, which sounds a bit more impressive than the reality, and have been for several years in line with other Muslim extremist groups like ISIS.  It all get’s very messy here as you have a ‘free speech’ hacker group like Anonymous, working towards the same target alongside ISIS sympathising hacking groups such as AnonGhost.  Obviously supporting any ISIS related group is kind of a backwards step toward promoting free speech and liberty.

Anyway the point is that instead of just stealing a few user details and posting up a bit of tedious cyber graffiti which is overwritten half an hour later, they did something different.   They stole lots of credit card details from an Israeli based site and posted some of them online, the rest they used to make donations to a Palestinian children’s charity.

anonghostdonate

Well that’s the story at least, there is a little bit of evidence to support it but not enough to be completely sure. The irony of course relies on these being stolen Israeli credit cards. Though whether the payments were completed by the charity site – fundrazr, is also perhaps difficult to believe -especially after the facts were posted all over the web.

As usual, the attackers probably didn’t hide their tracks very well and unless they used some very secure VPNs, like these, have probably now got loads of their details listed on databases compiled by various security agencies like GCHQ and the NSA.  However as a stunt,  it was at least a little bit innovative.