How to Unlock More Movies on Netflix

One of the problems with Netflix is it’s just too big! Much is made of of it’s super clever algorithm which is designed to guide you to your favorite shows, however the reality is that most of us will never come across thousands of the shows and movies stored on there. Most of the versions of Netflix are the same but the US version has even more content with some estimates suggesting tens of thousands more films and TV shows. Here’s how to unlock more movies on Netflix using a simple hack.

So how can we browse all these films more easily, well some clever chap has discovered a way to break out of Netflix’s suggested movies mode and dive straight into specific categories.

It turns out that you can go straight to thousands of pre-defined categories on Netflix just by using the correct URL. For instance, here’s a few.

Classic Comedies – http://www.netflix.com/browse/genre/31694
Music Documentaries – http://www.netflix.com/browse/genre/90361
Sports Dramas – http://www.netflix.com/browse/genre/7243

You can access them by modifying the end number of the URL and you’ll be directed straight to that category if you’re logged into Netflix. There are in fact 76,000 different categories some of them extremely specific – for instance there’s a category of ‘Witty Movies by Woody Allen’.

Fortunately someone has produced an incredible list of all 76000 categories which you can find on this link. Just have a browse and you’re bound to find a few categories of interest that you’ve never found.

What’s more if you switch to another version of Netflix then these categories still work but you’ll see different movies and shows depending on which country. SO for example you could use one the Netflix VPNs such as this and switch countries before clicking the URL and see loads more. That means you can go directly to very specific genres under each country variant armed with this list and a Netflix working VPN.

It’s definitely worth trying and of course the Netflix algorithm will pick up on your choices after you watch and rate them to update your standard auto-generated menu’s too.

Innovative Cyber Criminals Hack Austrian Hotel

One of the main reasons that in the past cyber crime was never too much of an issue, was the fact that many of the people who were capable of performing the attacks were not that good at the criminal side of it.   Hopeless geeks would steal stuff nobody wanted and then get picked up when they tried extorting money.   This is changing now in a big way as cyber gangs across the world start working with organised crime and becoming much more effective.

Luxury Hotels Targeted by Hackers

One of the current hot cyber crimes is ransomware, getting access to a system and denying access to the data or applications themselves.  A popular method is for viruses to encrypt important data and destroying it unless a payment is made.   It does work occasionally but only on badly configured and poorly defended systems – any half decent disaster recovery system will make such attacks ineffective.

However the latest targets of slightly modified attacks are big hotel chains.  Hotels have long been a target for technological crime, often because there’s a mix of wealthy people using mobile devices and poor levels of IT support and administration.   Previous targets have been hijacking Hotel Wifi systems or infecting lobby computers to steal usernames and passwords.   The latest twist however is to target a much more practical application, the hackers are taking over the hotels keycard systems.  The application which controls, registers and deregisters the room control cards – effectively controlling access to guests rooms – locking them in or out at will.   These are often also linked directly to reservation systems which can also cause havoc for any hotel.

There have been many rumours of these attacks taking place, however one hotel has decided to admit that they were attacked and decided to pay the ransom.  The hotel is a luxurious four star place in Austria called the Romantic Seehotel Jaegerwirt set alongside a beautiful Alpine lake.   Like many modern hotels they have a sophisticated IT system which controls all the key cards.   When the system was compromised none of the keys worked and nobody could open any of the room doors – customers were either locked in or out of their room.

Imagine the chaos that would cause the hotel management, especially on the opening weekend of their busy Winter season.  Then the demand came, a relatively modest request for 1500 EUR paid in Bitcoins in order to restore their key card system and access to the reservation application.  As the manager pointed out, the police and insurance are of little help when you have 180 guests locked out of their rooms.  The manager decided that paying the demand was quicker and cheaper than any other alternative.  There are two crucial aspects to this case, the modest request and the fact that when it was paid the hackers kept their word and restored the system.   These factors are crucial to convincing  victims that ‘paying up’ is the sensible option it in fact the best business decision in the circumstances.

Cyber crime is moving into a new and more dangerous phase than the amateuristic attacks we have seen in the past.   More and more of our world and systems are accessible online, the IoT (Internet of Things) is bringing vulnerabilities into our world that previously didn’t exist and criminals are using these avenues to run their businesses.  The hotel has interestedly identified an upgrade that will prevent these attacks in the future, their next refurbishments will replace the keycards with ordinary keys which were originally used by the hotel when it opened over a hundred years ago.

UK Users to Receive Piracy Warning Letters

A couple of weeks ago I sat in the front room of an elderly neighbour, on the TV screen was a Premier League football match being broadcast on Sky Sports.    I was surprised because I knew this chap struggled on a basic pension and the Sky Sports package is not cheap!   However I then noticed the digital box, it was not the standard Sky digital  box but a custom TV media box complete with VPNs.

For a few pounds a year to cover updates, this box was pre-installed with a version of Kodi and a few extras which granted free access to every single Sky subscription channel.  The cost of these channels if paid for legitimately would be over a hundred pounds a month, yet the cost for these was virtually nothing.  The box even simulated the Sky selection screen which meant that this 80 year old man was happily surfing at the cutting edge of digital piracy.

A New Breed of Digital Pirate?

It turns out his nephew has installed it and he’d been using it for several months.   He was blissfully unaware that technically he was stealing all this content from Sky and to be honest I didn’t feel the need to spoil his enjoyment by telling him

The reality is that in the UK and indeed across the world, digital piracy is starting to hit the mainstream.  In millions of households, neat little digital boxes sit happily under TVs streaming illegal copies of US cable channels or UK satellite channels.  It’s got to the point that it’s so common that most people don’t even consider it illegal, something like taping a radio programme or copying a DVD.  After all why pay a fortune monthly to some huge media conglomerate when you can purchase a pre-installed media streamer that supplies the same for nothing.

It does of course, cost the media companies huge amounts of lost revenue and obviously they are trying to stop this.  In the UK this month, will see the first phase of action designed to stop this behaviour.  The biggest ISPs in the UK will all be sending out emails to any individual who’s internet connection is being used to download copyrighted material illegally.

It’s been discussed for years but has always been postponed for a variety of reasons.   For example there was a lot controversy when copyright holders started using a practice dubbed as speculative invoicing.  These were basically demands for money threatening legal action against anyone who’s internet connection was being used to download copyrighted material – you can read about in this article – Bittorrents Monitored.   The issue has never been detecting the downloads but rather what actions can be taken, legally it was very difficult to prove an individual was responsible even if their internet connection was being used.

The letters will be sent in the form of emails, and will simply inform the user that their internet connection is being used to download copyrighted material and information about where it can be obtained legitimately.    There will be no threats, fines or further action and critics have pointed out that it will have little effect.   The action will only target P2P users, those who download using torrents and file shares – however the use of these methods has fallen dramatically over the last few years.  The majority of people who view copyrighted material now stream directly using these TV boxes and programs such as Kodi which are slightly more difficult to detect.

It is likely that these users will be targeted later although who knows how long this will take.